Artic ice sheet 2014

Jul 01, 2019 · The vast expanse of sea ice around Antarctica has suffered a “precipitous” fall since 2014, satellite data shows, and fell at a faster rate than seen in the Arctic. The plunge in the average ...

Dec 10, 2018 · The NASA research team found that in the 1980s, sea ice on average in the Arctic was 6.6 feet thick in October. From there, on average 3.3 more feet of sea ice would form through the winter. Mar 03, 2014 · Arctic sea ice extent for February 2014 was 14.44 million square kilometers (5.58 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that month. The black cross indicates the geographic North Pole. Sea Ice Index data.

While the Antarctic sea ice yearly wintertime maximum extent hit record highs from 2012 to 2014 before returning to average levels in 2015, both the Arctic wintertime maximum and its summer minimum extent have been in a sharp decline for the past decades. Arctic - Arctic - Greenland ice sheet: The glaciers of the north polar regions can be divided into two groups depending on the source of their snow. The larger group is around the North Atlantic and its marginal seas; the smaller is nourished by moisture from the North Pacific Ocean. One estimate suggests that there could be as much as 140 +/- 20 Gigatons of liquid water stored within the Greenland Ice Sheet – enough to raise global mean sea level by 0.4 mm. Put another way, this stored water has the effect of somewhat delaying and/or damping the response of global mean sea level to ice sheet melting (Forster et al, 2014. Oct 28, 2016 · Arctic sea ice has not only been shrinking in surface area in recent years, it’s becoming younger and thinner as well. In this animation, where the ice cover almost looks gelatinous as it pulses ...

Feb 16, 2018 · Arctic ice melting matters because, as Brad Plumer wrote for Vox, Right next door to all that Arctic sea ice is the massive ice sheet sitting atop land in Greenland. May 27, 2014 · A global climate model with interactive vegetation and a coupled ice sheet‐shelf component is used to test the response of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) to increased sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and reduced sea ice (SI) cover during the mid‐Pliocene warm period (∼3 Ma) as reconstructed from proxy records.