Indiana bat fact sheet

Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens)Fact Sheet . PDF version . Photo by Adam Mann, Environmental Solutions and Innovations . The gray bat is an endangered species. Endangered Species are animals and plants that are in danger of becomin

The Indiana bat was listed as endangered in 1967 due to episodes of people disturbing hibernating bats in caves during winter, resulting in the death of large numbers of bats. Indiana bats are vulnerable to disturbance because they hibernate in large numbers in only a few caves (the largest hibernation caves support from 20,000 to 50,000 bats).

The Indiana bat is an important predator within the Great Plains. The Indiana bat perpetuates biodiversity by consuming moths, mosquitoes, and flies under the night sky. This bat sleeps in abandoned caves and mines during the winter months for hibernation and under tree bark during the warmer seasons. The bats usually cluster fairly near the entrance and awaken periodically throughout the winter. During the summer, Indiana bats roost in trees, usually under loose, exfoliating bark as found on shagbark hickories and dead hardwoods, or in hollow trees. The roost sites are typically at a woodland edge where the tree is warmed by the sun. The bats Wildlife Habitat Fact Sheets. These fact sheets provide information about beneficial habitat management and practices for Indiana wildlife. To learn more about each practice, click on the fact sheet. The fact sheets are available in Adobe reader format. 645 - Upland Wildlife Habitat Management - Wildlife Brush Pile Job Sheet (DOC, 770 KB) Biology Fact Sheet: Indiana Bat (DOC, 168 KB) NRCS Program Job Sheet Links. NOTE: The most current Program Job Sheets can be found on the Indiana NRCS Program page. Biology Technical Notes. Indiana Technical Notes can be accessed from the link below. This fact sheet is applicable to non-Federal projects. In addition, utility-scale wind turbines may attract and cause mortality of bats and warrant additional considerations. Please also note that the Indiana bat, listed as endangered under the ESA in 1973, also occurs in forests in portions of Michigan.

The Indiana bat is an important predator within the Great Plains. The Indiana bat perpetuates biodiversity by consuming moths, mosquitoes, and flies under the night sky. This bat sleeps in abandoned caves and mines during the winter months for hibernation and under tree bark during the warmer seasons. Bat populations have declined by the millions due to the devastating impacts of white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that infects species like the Indiana bat, northern long-eared bat, tricolored bat, and other bats that hibernate through winter in caves. The area Indiana bats travel and feed in changes depending on the bat and the time of year. Home ranges are about 625 hectares during the fall, and 255 hectares in the spring. They don't defend their home ranges, but mothers may defend a maternity colony from potential threats that come within 5 sq m. Conservation Reserve Program. The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) provides technical and financial assistance to eligible farmers to address soil, water, and related natural resource concerns on their lands in an environmentally beneficial and cost-effective manner.