Uv curing inks datasheet wavelength

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are a type of electromagnetic rays used to initiate the photochemical process, or UV curing, in inks, varnishes and coatings. UV inks are made up of oligomers, monomers, pigments, additives and photoinitiators. The polymerisation reaction can be via a radical or cationic mechanism.

UV LED Curing Because of the limited spectral wavelength, UV LED primarily operates in the UV-A zone and considered to be ‘safe’ because it is closest to visible light. However, prolonged exposure to this energy can be dangerous. The UV-B and much of the UV-C spectrums of light are primarily used for germicidal and sterilization purposes.

UV curing resins are used in a variety of applications in the coating, ink and adhesive industry. They have become very popular resin systems due to their high productivity, ease of application, and low(er) impact on the environment. They are often the best choice when fast drying and curing is needed. UV curing resins are used in a variety of applications in the coating, ink and adhesive industry. They have become very popular resin systems due to their high productivity, ease of application, and low(er) impact on the environment. They are often the best choice when fast drying and curing is needed. Immediate curing and adhesion by UV radiation: an ecological and energy-saving ink. The UV-curable ink is cured and adhered to the media or substrate by UV radiation. The print is already dried when it comes out of the printer, allowing a short delivery request to be met. The Experts in UV light technology - UV curing lamps, UVC germicidal light bulbs, handheld UV cure systems, UV ovens, lab chambers, & UVC disinfection devices.

However, UV curing inks are as much as three times the cost of regular heatset inks, and are used only in specialty printing, such as liquor cartons, cosmetic packaging, metal decoration, screen printing, and flexography. The most common configuration of UV curing equipment is a mercury vapor lamp. In the near-visible range of the spec- trum, we find the range of wavelengths identified as UV. The UV range occurs at approximately 10-400 nm. The photoini- ators used in UV inks typically react to specific wavelengths within the 200- to 400-nm range. Systems which cure by means of radiation accordingly use UV light (wavelengths between 100 and 380 nm) to cure inks, varnishes, silicones, seals and adhesives, for example. Besides UV arc lamps, LED systems have seen increasing use in industrial curing since the turn of the millennium.